environment

Web Development Skills Comes with Voracity

1h2o_logo

Voracious, bulldog, hungry – those were words my editor Joseph B. Treaster at the Knight Center for International Media said needed to describe me if I truly wanted to be a journalist. He reported for over 30 years at the New York Times, which makes those adjectives perfect to describe his professional style.

I learned quite a bit from him about being persistent and speedy. It came in handy as I worked as his Associate Editor on 1H2O.org, an online magazine about the worldwide water crisis. Part of my job was to edit and gather content as well as work with freelance journalists around the world reporting from their respective hometowns, such as Marko Phiri in Zimbabwe and Ada M. Alvarez in Argentina.

And because the journalism job market in Miami was tough, I decided to apply some of my newfound voracity in learning and practicing web development skills. So not only did I maintain 1H2O.org, but I also had the opportunity to develop the design and structure for the following two websites.

Knight.miami.edu – The Knight Center for International Media focused on stories for positive change in communities around the world.

Knight Center for International Media

Aguasnegras.glocalstories.org – Aguas Negras or “Black Waters” is the term used for the polluted water source for Mexico City and surrounding farmlands. Photojournalist Janet Jarman investigates how this environmental issue affects the locals and their businesses.

Aguas Negras - A Report by Janet Jarman

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Going In-Depth on Business’ Need for Fish

Blue Crab

Photo by Brian Schlansky

Blue crabs, fish, and some other sea creatures creep me out a little bit. It’s something about their cold, slimy, expressionlessness that makes no distinction between them being dead or alive… until one moves.

For one undergraduate project called The Fish at Bay, classmate Brian Schlansky and I got to join a family that owns a fresh seafood market on a short boat ride to catch some blue crabs. When those little guys got to escape the box in which they were poured, they chased you around the boat.

Brian and I produced a video and I wrote an in-depth article on the different kinds of businesses in South Florida that depend on a plentiful, local fish population.

It was one of out five stories that a class of students put together. And it was so much fun to work on, not just for our adventure into Biscayne Bay but also because I got to taste so much amazing seafood. Sorry blue crab, but I prefer you cooked.

Fish Dependency: How South Florida Businesses Rely on the Resource from Walyce Almeida on Vimeo.